St. Peter’s Church Now Open for Mass! 

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St. Peter’s Church is open for Mass everyday. From Monday to Friday the church is open for Mass at 8:00 a.m. and for prayer in the morning and early afternoon. Mass on Sundays is celebrated at 5:00 p.m. on Saturday and 9:00 and 11:15 a.m. on Sunday. 

We are able to accommodate up to 30% of our capacity (200 maximum), so it is recommended that you come early. Those who attend our busiest Mass at 11:15 a.m. on Sunday might consider attending the 9:00 a.m. Mass. 

At this time we are observing strict social distancing. Those who attend are encouraged to bring their own personal protection equipment. 

If you have been in contact with anyone with the COVID 19 virus within the last 14 days, you are asked to stay home. Those with a fever or any symptoms should also stay home.

During this time, the parish washrooms are not available. 

For the time being, the parish office will be open only one day a week—Wednesdays from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. You are asked to make an appointment before visiting the office for the safety of the staff. 

Fr. Michael is available by phone at 416-534-4219, ext. 211 and all messages are returned.

Thank you to all who have supported the parish during this difficult time. Donations can be mailed to the parish at 659 Markham Street, Toronto On M6G 2M1, left in the mail slot at the Sisters of Life entrance, or made through Donate Now at the Archdiocese of Toronto. If using Donate Now at  www.archtoronto.org, please be sure to select St. Peter’s Toronto as you parish.

We look forward to seeing you soon and praying together again.

In Memoriam: Paulist Fr. Rich Colgan (1952 – 2020)

With great sadness, we announce that Paulist Fr. Richard Colgan has entered eternal life. 

Fr. Rich died at 11:45 p.m. on Monday, May 25, 2020, at Washington Hospital Center in Washington, D.C., of complications from COVID-19. He was the first Paulist Father to die as a result of the coronavirus.  

In 1991, Fr. Rich moved to Toronto, Canada. In 1992 and 1993, he served there at St. Peter’s Church and Toronto’s Catholic Information Center. In Autumn 2008, he returned to Toronto where he became pastor of St. Peter’s Church. He served in that role until becoming director of novices for the Paulist Fathers in 2011.  Click here to learn more about Fr. Rich. 

A Mother’s Day Story and Blessing

Every year on Mother’s Day, I love to tell the story of an episode of Sesame Street that I recall from many years ago.

The muppet puppets were featured in a story in which a little boy was separated from his mother. As the boy was crying in the town’s piazza because he could not find his mother, the king of that town came upon him and asked him why he was crying. The little boy responded that he had been separated from his mother and could not find her.

The king asked the little boy what his mother looked like and promised to send his entire army out to find her. The boy exclaimed that his mother “was the most beautiful women in the world.” The king dispatched his army to find the most beautiful women in the world so that she might be re-united with her son. The soldiers in the army brought back all of the beautiful women in the kingdom to be re-united with the child. Each time the boy was presented with another person to ask if this was his mother, he said “no, that is not her.” They continued to bring all of the women in the kingdom. Finally, the king said to the boy, we have brought you every beautiful women in the kingdom. And the boy said, but I told you “my mother is the most beautiful women in the world.

When it seemed like all of the women in the kingdom had been brought, everyone was beginning to lose hope that the boy would ever be re-united with his mother. Finally, a worn down and poorly dressed women made her way in to the king’s court and the boy shrieked in gladness at the sight of his mother.

Surprised that this was the boy’s mother, the king said, “I thought that you said that your mother was the most beautiful women in the world.” The boy exclaimed that “she is indeed the most beautiful women in the world. What took you so long to find her?”

Today we celebrate and give thanks for the gift of our mothers. I will offer Mass for the mothers of all the parishioners of St. Peter’s Parish—those living and deceased.

Thank you to all the mothers of the parish who are to their children the most beautiful women in the world.

May God bless the mothers of our parish today and always.

Fr. Michael

Divine Mercy Sunday and COVID 19

There is a song that I used to like very much when I was a child. It is one that I am sure many of you will recognize. Its words are as follows:

He’s got the whole world in His hands
He’s got the whole world in His hands
He’s got the whole world in His hands
He’s got the whole world in His hands

He’s got the itty bitty baby in His hands
He’s got the itty bitty baby in His hands
He’s got the itty bitty baby in His hands
He’s got the whole world in His hands

He’s got a-you and me brother in His hands
He’s got a-you and me brother in His hands
He’s got a-you and me brother in His hands
He’s got the whole world in His hands

He’s got a-you and me sister in His hands
He’s got a-you and me sister in His hands
He’s got a-you and me sister in His hands
He’s got the whole world in His hands

He’s got the whole world in His hands
He’s got the whole world in His hands
He’s got the whole world in His hands
He’s got the whole world in His hands

The point of this song is pretty simple. It reminds us over and over again, that God holds all of us in His hands and because of His loving care, we will all be fine. As a child, this song made me feel safe and reminded me that the world was in God’s hands and everything would be alright because of His unconditional love and mercy. Continue reading

Thank You for Remembering Your Parish in these Difficult Times!

Thank you to all those who have made an effort to remember the parish in these difficult times! Many people have mailed in their contributions, signed up for pre-authorized giving or simply left their donations in the mailbox. This makes such a great difference at this time. Your parish still has to pay its bills and utilities in order to be here for us when this is over.

If you are able to contribute to the upkeep of your parish church at this difficult time, all donations are greatly appreciated. You may mail in your contribution, sign-up for pre-authorized giving, or leave you donations in the mail slot in the door of the entrance to the offices of the Sisters of Life. You may also donate through the website of the Archdiocese of Toronto. You will be asked to select a parish, please select St. Peter’s Parish, Toronto.

 Thank you for all that you are able to do for your parish at this difficult time.

A Covid-19 Easter

My Dear Brothers and Sisters:

This past Palm Sunday, after I read the Passion Narrative of St. Matthew’s Gospel, alone in our parish church at the Masses , I could not help but think of how much we have in common with the first disciples of Jesus this Easter. After Jesus was arrested, his disciples locked themselves away in fear in their homes and in rooms by themselves. This Easter, we, and many of our loved ones, are locked up in our homes in fear and uncertainty because of the COVID 19 virus.

For the first disciples, the uncertainty and fear that they faced was due to the result of their concern that the Roman officials might also come and arrest them and punish them for being followers of one who claimed to be the King of the Jews. Jesus was ultimately arrested and put to death because He claimed to be the King of the Jews and this was seen as a political threat to Caesar and the occupying Roman army. The disciples feared that they would also be arrested, suffer and die as Jesus did. They were uncertain and anxious about their future and as a result shut themselves away in their homes and in the upper room to keep themselves safe. Today, as we are confronted by the uncertainty and fear of the COVID 19 virus, we are doing the same thing. What we have in common is uncertainty about the future and fear of suffering and death. Whether we are willing to admit it or not, this is actually the state that humanity finds itself in most of the time. Continue reading